Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Full Moon’ Category

novembermoon3

October was so rainy and overcast during the full moon period that I wasn’t able to get a glimpse of the moon, never mind a photo. I settled for a post celebrating the fall harvest, Dining With the Three Sisters. November has begun by blessing us with some sunny weather and the moon has been beaming down in the evening. The November full moon is variously called the Hunter’s Moon, the Beaver Moon, the Frost Moon and the Snow Moon.

Of these choices, the Frost Moon seems the most appropriate. We have been having our first taste of waking up to a landscape of white frost and windshields that need scraping in the morning. As the season progresses, each morning the frost seems a little heavier, a little more persistent. Thank goodness Snow Mooon is not yet the order of the day. No doubt by the time the December full moon is shining, Snow Moon will be more timely.

novembermoon

Hunter’s Moon is said to be a reflection of European traditions, when the November full moon provided light for shooting migrating birds. Native Americans also benefited from the light of the November full moon as they stockpiled resources for the upcoming winter. This perhaps led to the name Beaver Moon, as November was a time to set traps for beavers, before swamps froze, to ensure a supply of warm furs for the winter. Another interpretation is that Beaver Moon refers to the beavers’ own industrious preparations for the oncoming cold season.

Whichever name you prefer, viewing the full moon always seems to have some primeval appeal. The last mild evenings of the year make watching the November full moon a melancholic pleasure as we anticipate the arrival of cold weather.

novembermoon2

Read Full Post »

septmoon

The Corn Moon

The September full moon is called the Corn Moon. That fits the season perfectly here, where fresh, sweet corn can readily be purchased at markets and roadside stands throughout the area. RailGuy and I experimented with growing our own corn many years ago, but it is so easily available at this time of year, fresh picked from the field, it didn’t seem worth growing it ourselves. You can buy cobs of corn through the winter in supermarkets here too. But what would be the point? Corn is best when eaten as close to the moment it was harvested as possible. Clearly, there is a significant delay when corn is shipped in from the south in the middle of winter. We just wait till September and enjoy local corn while it is in season.

When we were growing our corn, Seneca Chief was a popular variety. Now it is considered an heirloom variety. About 30 years ago, “Peaches and Cream” began to make its way onto the market, and soon consumers wanted nothing but yellow-and-white corn. Peaches-and-cream has come to mean any yellow-and-white corn variety, but in fact, there are a number of bicolour corn varieties. I checked my Veseys seed catalogue and found they list 18 varieties of sweet corn. Seven are yellow and 11 are bicolour.

I miss my grown kids, who have all now left home and established their own households. However, some things are easier without kids to cater to. Like making dinner. We had a modest budget and didn’t use a lot of frozen pre-packaged dinners, eat out, or indulge in expensive cuts of meat or gourmet items. Still, we always ate good food. For years and years, every night I made dinner for everyone, day in, day out, week in, week out, month in…well, you get my drift. It seemed there was always someone who didn’t care for this or that, or was nicknaming one of my own favorite dishes “Crap on Rice”. When corn season rolled around, if I served corn a few nights in a row, someone was sure to object “Not corn AGAIN!” But now they’re gone. RailGuy and I love corn on the cob. We have it often. And no one says “Not corn AGAIN!” We enjoy every kernel.

corn

Read Full Post »

moon2

August full moon over corn field

The August full moon is celebrated in country and native lore as the Green Corn Moon. While the April full moon is called the Pink moon, there is precious little pink to be seen around here in April. Green Corn is a perfectly appropriate name for the August moon, however. It is amazing to learn that corn was being imported all the way from South Africa for milling in the early 20th century. Corn is now a commonplace crop, with some 21,000 corn producers in Ontario represented by the Ontario Corn Producers’ Association.

At this point in the summer, a drive along most any rural road will take you past at least a few fields of corn, reaching up six feet and more, with cobs of corn nestled against the stalks. Better still, a visit to a market or grocery store will offer an opportunity to bring home the first sweet corn of the season. Sweet corn, fresh from the field, boiled or barbecued in the husk, buttered, salted…mmmmm! Nothing like it!

Thank you to Birdgirl, who captured the Green Corn Moon on a recent visit, for the above photograph.

greencorn

Read Full Post »

moon

Birdgirl again. Monday night was the full moon, or more precisely, the wee hours of Tuesday morning was, as it occurred at 5:21 am. I missed it by a day, but it wouldn’t have mattered – the evening of the full moon was clouded over and rainy. With all the rain we’ve been experiencing lately, we were lucky to have clear skies last night to be able to see it, albeit a little past the true peak full moon. As dusk settled, a low-lying misty fog moved in across the fields, shrouding the trees in a pale haze that the bright moon illuminated, casting an eerie but magical feel to the landscape.

Native Americans named the July full moon the Buck Moon, because this is the time of year when White-tailed Deer bucks start growing their new antlers in preparation for the fall rut. It has often been called the Thunder Moon as well, since most thunderstorms occur in these humid summer days. European settlers called it the Hay Moon, as it took place at about the time of the first summer haying.

The July full moon also happens to closely coincide with the moon’s apogee – that is, the point in the moon’s orbit when it is furthest from earth. Because of the extra distance, the Buck Moon will appear about 12% smaller to the earthbound moon-watcher than the Wolf Moon of January, when the moon was at perigee, its closest.

Read Full Post »

The June full moon is the Strawberry Moon.

The June full moon is the Strawberry Moon.

Read Full Post »

moon

The May full moon is called the Flower Moon, in recognition of the rising abundance of flowers. I think the Green Moon might be a better name, as the world is never so tenderly, startlingly, brilliantly coloured as when Nature dresses herself in her new Spring Green. However, I took a walk around the garden to see what flowers are celebrating the full moon. The yellow daffodils and white bloodroot are winding down and new flowers are taking over the spotlight. The first lush deep-purple iris has opened. Old-fashioned bleeding heart, both traditional (Dicentra spectabillis) and white (D.s. forma alba) are nearing full bloom. Cushion spurge (Euphorbia polychroma) seems to be competing with the sun itself, with it’s brighter than bright yellow flowers. Woodland phlox (Phlox divaricata) is woven amongst the newly emerging hostas. Finally, the flowers on the graceful Smooth Solomon’s Seal (Polygonatum biflorum) will be opening shortly, and not a moment too soon because I spotted the first Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubirs) of the season on Friday afternoon.

Iris

Iris

Old-fashioned Bleeding Heart

Old-fashioned Bleeding Heart

White Bleeding Heart

White Bleeding Heart

Cushion Spurge

Cushion Spurge

Woodland phlox

Woodland phlox

Smooth Solomon's Seal

Smooth Solomon's Seal

Read Full Post »

Pink Moon: April

pinkmoon

The April full moon, according to the Old Farmer’s Almanac, is called the Pink Moon. It is so named after wild ground phlox, one of the earliest flowers of spring. Clearly this is based on habitats south of here because there is no sign of wildflowers of any type here yet. The closest I could come to a pink flower today was this hellabore bud.

hellabore

Not only are there no wildflowers painting the ground pink, the weather has been so cold that we have had sprinklings of snow turning the ground white!

robin

Although it is not unusual to get a bit of snow in April, even a significant snow storm, the return of the white stuff has prompted a lot of muttering around the blogisphere. Over at NAMBI, Birdgirl is sitting watching snowflakes fall, waiting for the mothing season to get underway. At Naturespeak, Gerry is looking out over his computer screen at a gentle snowfall descending from the sky. Carolyn of Roundtop Ruminations , and Dave of Via Negativa observe that spring snow that comes when the onions are sprouting in the garden is called “Onion Snow”. Maybe this April full moon is the Onion Moon.

rosehips

Read Full Post »

mmon2

The March full moon is named the Worm Moon, in recognition of the coming spring and the thawing of the soil. The Old Farmer’s Almanac endorses this name, but here in eastern Ontario it seems a bit early for worms. Other names sometimes used, the Crow Moon, the Sap, or Sugar Moon, seem more appropriate for our northern weather conditions right now. Still, it won’t be long till the earth is muddy and worms are at work. If you are a gardener, or otherwise a digger in soil, you might like to consider participating in Worm Watch this year.

wormscropped

One of the most amazing things about the natural world is how little we know about it. Scientists and environmentalists are increasingly appreciating the value of getting people interested and involved in gathering data on a number of phenomenon. Project Feederwatch, for example, has been gathering data from backyard feeders for about 30 years. While birds are easily viewed and many people enjoy winter bird feeding, worms aren’t as easy to study. Not much is currently known about earthworm diversity. At Worm Watch, you can learn about different kinds of worms and how to identify them, how to monitor worms and how to record your observations. The above-pictured poster is available to help you. Who knew there was a Canadian worm (Aporrectodea tuberculata)?

mmon3

Read Full Post »

Full moon, February 9, 2009

Full moon, February 9, 2009

Last night’s full moon was striking as it rose through patchy cloud cover early in the evening. Many cultures assign a name to each full moon of the year. The Old Farmer’s Almanac refers to the February full moon as the Snow Moon. Many native American names reflect the difficulty of life at this time of year and include the Bony Moon, the Hunger Moon and the Famine Moon.

The full moon has a magical presence. Indeed, it has long been associated with lunacy and even lycanthropy, the cult of the half man, half wolf, or werewolf. An interesting take on this, less frightening than traditional tales, is Elizabeth Coatsworth’s slim book The Werefox, originally published as Pure Magic, sadly currently out of print. The touching story, intended for young readers, tells how Johnny, a lonely New England farmboy who befriends the strange new boy next door, learns that Giles is a werefox and one wild night, saves his life.

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 105 other followers