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Posts Tagged ‘Broken Heart’

pixie parasol

Pixie Parasol

Daylily season peaks towards the end of July, but the first blooms are beginning to open. Every day brings a new face. Here are the flowers that have been kicking off the bloom season over the last few days.

suzy wong

Suzy Wong

brookwood lee causey

Brookwood Lee Causey

Starman's Quest

Starman’s Quest

Broken Heart

Broken Heart

Willow Wind

Willow Wind

Lavendar Blue Baby

Lavender Blue Baby

coyotemoon

Coyote Moon

Mati Hari

Mata Hari

Hold your Horses

Hold Your Horses

Tangerine Horses

Tangerine Horses

Fencing Master

Fencing Master

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Suzy Wong

Suzy Wong (Kennedy 1962)

The first of the dayliles to bloom this year was Suzy Wong, a very reliable older hybrid introduced in 1962. She’s the leader of the pack as the daylily season gets underway, the annual highlight of the garden calendar.

Coyote Moon

Coyote Moon (Kirchhoff 1994)

Just a day later was Coyote Moon. This prolific bloomer was introduced in 1994. It’s one of my favorites, with its bright round flowers touched by just a hint of copper.

Longstocking

Longstocking (Stamile 1997)

Third place goes to the large spider Longstocking. This plant had been overshadowed by a large bush, and I moved it to a sunnier location in the spring. Longstocking clearly appreciated the improved access to sunlight.

Tangerine Horses

Tangerine Horses (Kaskel 1996)

After a streak of intensely hot, humid days, we enjoyed a couple of days of light rain. This morning when I walked out into the garden, I found another half-dozen daylilies beginning to bloom, their first flowers freckled with raindrops. Here are this morning’s starlets.

Prince Redbird

Prince Redbird (Sellers 1986)

Hold Your Horses

Hold Your Horses (Trimmer 2004)

Serena Dancer

Serena Dancer (Marshall 1986)

Pixie Parasol

Pixie Parasol (Hudson 1975)

Broken Heart

Broken Heart (Kroll 1993)

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Coyote Moon

Daylily season, long-awaited, is getting underway. A few daylilies have been blooming for a week or so now. Coyote Moon (Hybridizer: Kirchhoff Registered: 1994) was new to the garden last year and has really settled in well. It has plenty of buds and produces very pretty, nicely shaped yellow flowers touched with cinnamon.

Suzy Wong

Suzy Wong (Kennedy 1962) is an older cultivar. The flowers don’t have the substance of many newer daylilies, but I like its fresh, lemony yellow. It is very floriferous, producing many buds over the daylily season.

Pixie Parasol

Pixie Parasol (Hudson 1975) has also been blooming for a while. It was the first daylily to bloom this year. Like Suzy Wong, I moved Pixie Parasol from my previous garden. I saved it, in part, because I think its name fits it so well.

Femme de Joie

Femme de Joie (Hayward 1979) is another old favorite that suits its name. The flowers really do look joyful. It tends to have weak scapes that let the heavy flowers droop, but it is holding up well so far this year.

Born Yesterday

Born Yesterday (Lambert 1972) always reminds me of my children when they were newborns. We have been getting some much-needed showers today, and I just dashed out and snapped a few photos during a brief interlude. The flowers are touched with raindrops.

Broken Heart

I moved Broken Heart (Kroll 1993) to a sunnier spot in the garden and it has suffered a bit of a setback from transplanting. However, it is still gamely producing a few flowers.

Yesterday Memories

Yesterday Memories (Spalding 1976) is a very pretty, unassuming pink that always does well. This was its first bloom this year.

Big Smile

Big Smile (Apps 1999) always makes me smile. I like its understated pale yellow, with white ribs and just a touch of pink on the petal edges, a very cheerful, good-natured look. I moved this plant in the spring too, and unlike Broken Heart, it seems very happy with the move. It settled right in and is blooming better this year than it did the last few years in a shadier location.

Curly Rosy Posy

Finally, here are two spidery flowers, Curly Rosy Posy (Hansen 1992) above, and Eggplant Escapade (Reed 1996) below. The season is off to a good start.

Eggplant Escapade

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ditchlily3

Hemerocallis fulva growing by the roadside.

Note: You can see more daylilies on their own page. Click on the tab labelled Daylilies above the Willow House Chronicles header.

The common daylily (Hemerocallis fulva) is a native of Asia. These rusty-orange dayliles were often found around old homesteads. They are tough, hardy plants, and can now be seen here and there, growing along roadsides, a habit that has earned them the name of Ditch Lily. The name ‘daylily’ is a simple description of the flowering habit: each bloom lasts for one day.  Long scapes hold the flowers above the sword-like foliage, and even though each bud blooms for but one day, the abundance of buds on each scape means the plant offers an extended display of bloom. The scientific name, hemerocallis, is from the Greek: day (hemera) + beauty (kallos). Originally the genus Hemerocallis was placed in the lily family, Liliaceae, but more recently it has been moved to the family Hemerocallidaceae.

Hemerocallis fulva spreads by fast-growing rhizomes and can be an aggressive garden plant. Modern hybrids developed from the species have a much more well-behaved clumping habit. And while the rusty-orange of the fulva sp is not unappealing, daylily hybrids are now available in a wide range of colours, from pinks and purples to creams, yellows and yes, even bright oranges, that makes the old standby drab by comparison. There is also a wide variety of plant and flower forms available. Flowers may have long petals and sepals (‘spiders’) or be flat and round (‘bagels’). Plants may be compact, with blooms held on short scapes or have tall scapes that reach as high as 60 inches. There are more than 10,000 hybrids registered with the American Hemerocallis Society, so gardeners can find a plant to please every taste. In Ontario, the daylily is celebrated by the Ontario Daylily Society.

The first few weeks of July mark the height of the daylily season, although a range of hybrids extend the season from spring through fall. Here are  photographs of a few that are blooming in my garden today. Included is the name of the hybridizer and the year the hybrid was registered.

galena gilt edge

Galena Gilt Edge (Blocher)

suzywong

Suzy Wong (Kennedy 1962)

helterskelter

Helter Skelter (Lambert 1981)

earthangel

Earth Angel (Stamile 1987)

brokenheart

Broken Heart (Kroll 1993)

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